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They were not perfect, but they were my friends. What is insanity?! Fore how natural is it really to exist in a world constantly defining you for you, where it is more important to seem something than truly BE it.

Perhaps we will never really know, certainly even now, far removed from the dates Kaysen found herself at home in an institution there are far more questions than answers.

Category: A Memoir View all 18 comments. While Susanna Keysen composes some very poetic essays offering alternative and sometimes beautiful perspectives in her autobiography, her general tone is very, very defensive.

Granted discussing whether or not one suffered from a mental illness can never be easy, but the book seems to be her manifesto for proving that she wasn't really borderline, as her therapist diagnosed.

I don't know enough about Borderline Personality Disorder to judge - I agree that it seems women are disproportionately di While Susanna Keysen composes some very poetic essays offering alternative and sometimes beautiful perspectives in her autobiography, her general tone is very, very defensive.

I don't know enough about Borderline Personality Disorder to judge - I agree that it seems women are disproportionately diagnosed with it, and a conservative environment could easily allow for any non-conformist woman to be blamed for her own marginalization and labeled insane.

However, while Keysen seems to want to be seen as simply non-conformist in an oppressive time, she was in some ways destructively so by her own admission.

She gave herself bruises, she attempted suicide, she tried to break into her own hand convinced it was a monkey's.

The early Sixties sounded like a terrible time to be a woman, and many of the mental institutions were anything but conducive to healing.

Nevertheless, I don't buy the defensive rebel's libertarian spiel that they should just be left alone to hurt themselves, uninterrupted. Perhaps Susanna wanted to criticize her diagnosis or how she was treated, but claiming that her acts of self-harm warranted no such "interruption" with treatment seems rather dramatic and ungrateful.

The adolescent glorification of the misunderstood, self-harming Plath-like waif is both dangerous and very selfish, and there are scores of books and songs and films to help this glorification along.

I hope girls who read this book are smart enough not to fall for it, but can still enjoy her moments of poetic greatness.

We're told not to, but I sometimes do judge a book by its cover. At least once in my life, it has paid off. I first read this book because I saw it laying under the desk of a girl in my French class in 8th grade and was immediately attracted to it- the constrast of blue against white and the separation and duality of the girl between.

It was beautiful and strange and thought-provoking and somehow irrationally felt as close to me as some crazy friend who'd been trapped in my own brain for thirteen We're told not to, but I sometimes do judge a book by its cover.

It was beautiful and strange and thought-provoking and somehow irrationally felt as close to me as some crazy friend who'd been trapped in my own brain for thirteen years.

The author at once seemed to be a part of me that hadn't yet been able to speak, and a complete stranger who frightened and compelled me.

I've returned to it time and time again and each time have found new truths and new absurdities. It so accurately and curiously expresses the truths of a mind in distress and the questioning of a woman in the making and particularly of a woman approaching adulthood in the 's, while psychology was still a relatively new field.

I lead a book club discussion of it some years ago and was startled at the stark honesty that it inspired in us as we talked, regardless of whether we actually liked the book or not.

To me, the book has nearly no relation to the movie other than the slight similarities between the premises.

Where the movie may introduce you to interesting characters and attempt to give you a linear story, it has no way to bring you into the complex and contradictory inner world of the author.

I will recommend to anyone to give it a try, because I believe what you discover in it speaks not of the book itself, but of who you as the reader are.

My situation was that I was in pain and nobody knew it, even I had trouble knowing it. So I told myself, over and over, You are in pain.

It was the only way I could get through to myself. I was demonstrating externally and irrefutably an inward condition. Look, this is a book where, if you already suffer from a mental health issue, you will get it.

You will draw parallels in your own life and experiences. You will nod in agreement at the internalisation, the questions, the doubt.

Absolutely nothing has changed there, from the 60's to today, and it never will. Its the nature of the beast. Having a mental health issue is all about doubt.

If, you're on the other side of this, if you have perfect mental health nobody does, but stay with me here , you probably wont understand this, and because you don't understand it, you probably wont enjoy it.

And there's nothing wrong with that. Absolutely nothing. Thanks to recent campaigns to draw awareness to mental health conditions, people these days are somewhat more receptive to the idea of others who's minds don't quite work the same way theirs do.

But, we are nowhere near where we need to be in regards to this issue. Nowhere near. This is a very brave story, published in an era when mental health wasn't talked about.

It may be somewhat outdated in respect to modern diagnosis' and treatments, but the feelings are all the same.

This book is so honest, and that shines through in every single sentence. It spoke to me, and I hope it speaks to you too.

View 1 comment. Saw the movie, loved Angelina in it. Now I'll tackle the book. Update: Finished the novel.

I'm now convinced that the publication and fantastic reception of this novel was probably a great case of timing.

Kaysen's account of her stay in McLean Hospital is a captivating look into her mental state during her 2 year stay. However, I've got to say that if she had stayed elsewhere, or tried to publish her account now, it probably wouldn't have been received as favorably.

For the most part, many of he Saw the movie, loved Angelina in it. For the most part, many of her intermittent stories read as a desperate cry for attention, ANY attention.

We're given a VERY brief description of her original interview, as well as interesting reproductions of her case files, but her rambling thoughts throughout give no impression of how she actually responded to her therapy.

I'm sad to say that I honestly expected more. I've seen more self-actualization on some Twitter ramblings than I saw in Girl, Interrupted.

Not worth the read. Kaysen's memoir paints a picture of a girl whose mental health is alternately proven through vivid awareness of the world around her, and disputed by accounts of self-harm and detachment.

It's interesting to note the similar war between those who have read this book. Half of them conclude that she was a confused and directionless young woman whose stint in McLean was the result of an intolerant society and a psychological field still in its kneejerk infancy.

They wonder, could that have been me? They come away shocked that such small acts of defiance by an obviously lucid person could have such a disproportionate response.

The remaining readers believe Kaysen, although honest and aware in her storytelling, was truly ill.

They also wonder, could that have been me? But it is different from the first group, because they see their own doubts about their mental health, their own oddities and their own struggles reflected in the girls of McLean.

The effect this book will have on you depends on how you define sanity. Mental Illness is always viewed with stigma and scorn even today.

The first thought that comes to our mind when we hear the term is the word "mad. The book follows Susanna Kaysen, who is diagnosed with borderline personality disorder when she was just 17 years old.

Once hospitalized, she befriends her inmates and together we get a glimpse of their lives and struggles. Definitely, a book that everyone needs to read at least o Mental Illness is always viewed with stigma and scorn even today.

Definitely, a book that everyone needs to read at least once in their lifetime. I never realized it was a book, and not only that but a true account from Susanna Kaysen.

The book is short, and cuts right to the point. The chapters are set up like thoughts or short concepts that Susanna wants to share.

The movie does a great job of sticking close to the book and I was impressed with how closely they matched. Susanna finds herself sent to Belmon 3.

Susanna finds herself sent to Belmont after an appointment with her Doctor. She certainly struggles with boredom and while her needs and desires were different from the average Cambridge resident, certainly not enough to commit her to an asylum.

I'm glad that I picked this one up and if you are interested in the subject matter, I would urge you to do the same. While the movie is absolutely a Hollywood adaption with much added storyline, drama, and a weird glamorization of "broken girls", it's still one that I've always really liked and watched many times.

I hoped the memoir would provide a much more realistic idea of what Susanna Kaysen's time at McLean Hospital actually looked like, as well as details that weren't included in the film.

Unfortunately, it reads like the barest bones of the script, meaning there's nothing here that wasn't in the movie.

A While the movie is absolutely a Hollywood adaption with much added storyline, drama, and a weird glamorization of "broken girls", it's still one that I've always really liked and watched many times.

And also what's here is vague and scattered, written often with an uninterested tone. I suppose this is more a collection of vignettes; snapshots and random memories of Susanna's time at the hospital.

I appreciate the style of writing, but it's not my favourite. I will say that last chapter is amazing. I absolutely loved the story of the Vermeer painting, and how Susanna saw two different versions at two different points in her life.

Ultimately I wish I could have had the opportunity to read this before the movie, and I think if you do you should take it.

I read this book around the time the movie came out. I remember liking it, but not loving it.

I'm curious to maybe do a re-read one day. I kind of felt like it was one of those books that got a lot of hype and didn't live up to it.

I liked the movie. If I ever do a re-read, I'll add to this. I don't remember much, to be honest, except that it didn't blow me away.

I bought the book and I ended up over the years donating it to a thrift store. So, I must not have liked it that much. View all 7 comments.

This book was a memoir of Susanna Kaysen's time in a mental institution and it was written in homodiegetic narration. When I first started this book I thought it would be an excellent insight into the damaged mind of a young eighteen year-old girl and I was looking forward to the intriguing thoughts of a mentally ill person.

However, I found that the book mostly focused on the author's time in the mental institution and I did not get a sense of how the illness affected herself.

Kaysen mainly desc This book was a memoir of Susanna Kaysen's time in a mental institution and it was written in homodiegetic narration.

Kaysen mainly described the other people she lived with and not so much about her own progress or life.

Furthermore, the chapters seemed to jump around a lot so there was no sense of chronology or order; perhaps this was meant to reflect how Kaysen's mind was chaotic and unstable but I found this quite annoying, making the book difficult to enjoy.

The writing style was simplistic and uninteresting making this novel an easy read. I also found that I did not connect or feel empathetic with the author despite the personal depiction of her story, which disheartened me somewhat as I hoped that I would feel deeply moved by her tale; realistically I felt bored and disconnected.

One aspect I did like was the insertion of real documents from the doctor's notes which were intriguing and informative.

Moreover, it gave me a greater understanding of the process of a mental institution, and I felt some pathos for the characters because their conditions were piteous.

In addition, Kaysen wrote how people treated them as unhuman which moved me slightly as mental illness is not something to scorn or mock but a very serious disorder.

The isolated situation of these people made me more aware of the prejudice surrounding mental illness and the way people instantly judge one who has dealt with a mental disorder; they tend to avoid them and feel scared or uneasy.

Overall, I did not enjoy this book very much, although at times it was quite informative and it was also interesting to see how living in a mental institution was like in the s.

View all 3 comments. I read Susanna Kaysen's memoir as an impressionable young teen. As I started reading it, at first I couldn't understand why this young woman, who had wealth and status, could be so unhappy that she required to be institutionalized.

At times I had to keep reminding myself that this was a memoir and not a fictional story. I ended up really enjoying this memoir, and although the movie took many liberties, I also enjoyed the movie: Winona Ryder nailed Kaysen's neurotic character and Angelina Jolie t I read Susanna Kaysen's memoir as an impressionable young teen.

I ended up really enjoying this memoir, and although the movie took many liberties, I also enjoyed the movie: Winona Ryder nailed Kaysen's neurotic character and Angelina Jolie took home the Oscar for her role as the psychopathic Lisa.

Now this was a welcome blast from my past! View 2 comments. This was a quick read but excellently written. I saw the movie years ago, which is different than the book.

There are so many changes encountered while growing up and becoming an adult that it is very difficult to adjust to the changes and make the transition to being a successful, independent person.

I've been meaning to read this book I guess for most of my life, well teenage years and now adulthood but never ever got around to doing so.

Life and other books getting in the way. But now that I have I am glad that I did. But now I have questions, thoughts? How would this book made me feel if I read it while still a teenager with my teenage mentality.

Do I feel how I feel now? I look back at myself and I think yes. Because let's be honest, I personally don't think I'm that much different now; I've been meaning to read this book I guess for most of my life, well teenage years and now adulthood but never ever got around to doing so.

Because let's be honest, I personally don't think I'm that much different now; Older? I would hope.

Confused and unsure? At times. I have days. I have my issues but then again I think everyone does.

What is sane? Who defines what's "normal"? Because I don't think I've ever been "normal" but does that make me crazy? Also what's wrong with a little madness?

Do we have to all fit the same mold? An interesting look in to a subject of which I have little knowledge.

Susanna Kaysen shares her experience of living in a woman's mental institution for two years during the 's when she was 18 years old.

This was a very quick and easy read - the narrative is broken up with scanned documents from Susanna's case and she discusses what the doctors and nurses have to say about her.

I wasn't blown away by this novel- I think I just expected a little more from it. I found the topic to be very inter An interesting look in to a subject of which I have little knowledge.

I found the topic to be very interesting and I would love some recommendations for other books of this sort.

I would recommend to any who have an interest in psychology and the treatment of mental health issues in the 's. The fifth book in my project reading one book from each year of my life.

I started this one last night, getting through 25 pages in the blink of an eye. I read the next 75 pages this morning before eating breakfast, and finished it while playing Assassins Creed, cooking dinner, eating dinner, and then after dinner.

I also loved that the title is taken from the title of a pa 4. I also loved that the title is taken from the title of a painting!

There was a bit towards the end where it got a bit clinical and analytical but it ended strongly. The thrill is in the sauce.

Although Kaysen did find her confinement necessary, and voluntary, not all had such pleasures of paying royalty rent in places like McLean.

I applaud her story with bright and shiny details that paved prose and seamless chapters into a full day read with no need for a break.

Whatever the case, my main gripe with this book—that it follows that very unconnected structure and is told out of chronological order—can be justified by the simple fact that its intent is to disorient, and it achieves this end admirably.

For this being a memoir, Susanna seems incredibly distanced from—and even bored by—the events she describes.

The best chapters are the philosophical ones, where she ruminates on the nature of madness and the many ways it can manifest.

These, ultimately, are what redeemed the book and why it gets three stars from me. Susanna can be incredibly insightful and descriptive when she wants to be, but she mostly seems content skidding by on the surface of things without making any effort at character development, description, or tone-setting.

It is told plainly and with a flat affect, as disinterested as a tranquilised psychiatric patient, content to loll in a ratty easy chair and stare mindlessly at the TV.

There is no colour to this book. If I had to assign it a colour, it would be the colour of dryer lint, or bathroom walls in that specific tone of beige that must have been manufactured in purgatory to desiccate your very soul.

Perhaps this is all meant to give the reader the most realistic possible feeling of being confined in a mental institution in the s: the boredom, the listlessness, the lack of a unifying theme or plot.

While there were some entertaining parts, I found the whole book strangely cold and lacking. The author gives virtually no insights whatsoever into her own illnes, or really how she felt about the whole situation.

She came across a little like a spoilt ungrateful rich kid, which granted, at some point she does make a semi reference to. I could not really comprehend I what she was trying to do with this book,or who she was at all.

I felt like she was telling the stories of those ar Disappointing. I felt like she was telling the stories of those around her because she didn't want to talk about her own.

Her parents and life outside the hospital are barely even mentioned, it felt to me like very defensive writing.

You know, I'll write a book about my time in a mental hospital without actually writing about my time in in a mental hospital I can't understand the hype around this one at all.

The only thing I can put it down to, it's that the people that love it have not read many books about mental illness.

Try " One flew over the cuckoos nest" or heck, even "Prozac nation" I've watched the movie multiple times, and loved it; but I'm sad to say this is one of the times that the movie adaption was far superior to the book.

I enjoyed the insight, and as someone with a BPD diagnosis I definitely recognised patterns of thought or behaviours that felt familiar to me, but I feel as if it didn't move me as much as I was hoping it would.

Reading this has definitely motivated me to look deeper into literature focusing on mental illness, and more specifically BPD, but for no I've watched the movie multiple times, and loved it; but I'm sad to say this is one of the times that the movie adaption was far superior to the book.

Reading this has definitely motivated me to look deeper into literature focusing on mental illness, and more specifically BPD, but for now I'm leaving this one with a rating of 3.

This probably wasn't the best book to read while currently trying to recover from mental illness, but I honestly just felt nothing for this book.

I felt like the attachment between the writer and the reader that is supposed to be there wasn't there at all.

I also couldn't understand some of the scans of the documents as the writing was ineligible, at least for me. Readers also enjoyed.

Biography Memoir. About Susanna Kaysen. Susanna Kaysen is an American author. Kaysen was born and raised in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Kaysen attended high school at the Commonwealth School in Boston and the Cambridge School before being sent to McLean Hospital in to undergo psychiatric treatment for depression.

It was there she was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. She was released after eighteen months. She later drew Susanna Kaysen is an American author.

She later drew on this experience for her memoir Girl, Interrupted , which was made into a film in , her role being played by Winona Ryder.

Her mother, deceased, was sister of architect Richard Neutra. Kaysen also has one sister and has been divorced at least once.

She lived for a time in the Faroe Islands, upon which experience her novel Far Afield is based. Books by Susanna Kaysen.

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The first thought that comes to our mind when we hear the term is the word "mad. The book follows Susanna Kaysen, who is diagnosed with borderline personality disorder when she was just 17 years old.

Once hospitalized, she befriends her inmates and together we get a glimpse of their lives and struggles.

Definitely, a book that everyone needs to read at least o Mental Illness is always viewed with stigma and scorn even today.

Definitely, a book that everyone needs to read at least once in their lifetime. I never realized it was a book, and not only that but a true account from Susanna Kaysen.

The book is short, and cuts right to the point. The chapters are set up like thoughts or short concepts that Susanna wants to share.

The movie does a great job of sticking close to the book and I was impressed with how closely they matched. Susanna finds herself sent to Belmon 3.

Susanna finds herself sent to Belmont after an appointment with her Doctor. She certainly struggles with boredom and while her needs and desires were different from the average Cambridge resident, certainly not enough to commit her to an asylum.

I'm glad that I picked this one up and if you are interested in the subject matter, I would urge you to do the same.

While the movie is absolutely a Hollywood adaption with much added storyline, drama, and a weird glamorization of "broken girls", it's still one that I've always really liked and watched many times.

I hoped the memoir would provide a much more realistic idea of what Susanna Kaysen's time at McLean Hospital actually looked like, as well as details that weren't included in the film.

Unfortunately, it reads like the barest bones of the script, meaning there's nothing here that wasn't in the movie. A While the movie is absolutely a Hollywood adaption with much added storyline, drama, and a weird glamorization of "broken girls", it's still one that I've always really liked and watched many times.

And also what's here is vague and scattered, written often with an uninterested tone. I suppose this is more a collection of vignettes; snapshots and random memories of Susanna's time at the hospital.

I appreciate the style of writing, but it's not my favourite. I will say that last chapter is amazing. I absolutely loved the story of the Vermeer painting, and how Susanna saw two different versions at two different points in her life.

Ultimately I wish I could have had the opportunity to read this before the movie, and I think if you do you should take it.

I read this book around the time the movie came out. I remember liking it, but not loving it. I'm curious to maybe do a re-read one day. I kind of felt like it was one of those books that got a lot of hype and didn't live up to it.

I liked the movie. If I ever do a re-read, I'll add to this. I don't remember much, to be honest, except that it didn't blow me away.

I bought the book and I ended up over the years donating it to a thrift store. So, I must not have liked it that much. View all 7 comments.

This book was a memoir of Susanna Kaysen's time in a mental institution and it was written in homodiegetic narration.

When I first started this book I thought it would be an excellent insight into the damaged mind of a young eighteen year-old girl and I was looking forward to the intriguing thoughts of a mentally ill person.

However, I found that the book mostly focused on the author's time in the mental institution and I did not get a sense of how the illness affected herself.

Kaysen mainly desc This book was a memoir of Susanna Kaysen's time in a mental institution and it was written in homodiegetic narration.

Kaysen mainly described the other people she lived with and not so much about her own progress or life. Furthermore, the chapters seemed to jump around a lot so there was no sense of chronology or order; perhaps this was meant to reflect how Kaysen's mind was chaotic and unstable but I found this quite annoying, making the book difficult to enjoy.

The writing style was simplistic and uninteresting making this novel an easy read. I also found that I did not connect or feel empathetic with the author despite the personal depiction of her story, which disheartened me somewhat as I hoped that I would feel deeply moved by her tale; realistically I felt bored and disconnected.

One aspect I did like was the insertion of real documents from the doctor's notes which were intriguing and informative.

Moreover, it gave me a greater understanding of the process of a mental institution, and I felt some pathos for the characters because their conditions were piteous.

In addition, Kaysen wrote how people treated them as unhuman which moved me slightly as mental illness is not something to scorn or mock but a very serious disorder.

The isolated situation of these people made me more aware of the prejudice surrounding mental illness and the way people instantly judge one who has dealt with a mental disorder; they tend to avoid them and feel scared or uneasy.

Overall, I did not enjoy this book very much, although at times it was quite informative and it was also interesting to see how living in a mental institution was like in the s.

View all 3 comments. I read Susanna Kaysen's memoir as an impressionable young teen. As I started reading it, at first I couldn't understand why this young woman, who had wealth and status, could be so unhappy that she required to be institutionalized.

At times I had to keep reminding myself that this was a memoir and not a fictional story. I ended up really enjoying this memoir, and although the movie took many liberties, I also enjoyed the movie: Winona Ryder nailed Kaysen's neurotic character and Angelina Jolie t I read Susanna Kaysen's memoir as an impressionable young teen.

I ended up really enjoying this memoir, and although the movie took many liberties, I also enjoyed the movie: Winona Ryder nailed Kaysen's neurotic character and Angelina Jolie took home the Oscar for her role as the psychopathic Lisa.

Now this was a welcome blast from my past! View 2 comments. This was a quick read but excellently written. I saw the movie years ago, which is different than the book.

There are so many changes encountered while growing up and becoming an adult that it is very difficult to adjust to the changes and make the transition to being a successful, independent person.

I've been meaning to read this book I guess for most of my life, well teenage years and now adulthood but never ever got around to doing so.

Life and other books getting in the way. But now that I have I am glad that I did. But now I have questions, thoughts? How would this book made me feel if I read it while still a teenager with my teenage mentality.

Do I feel how I feel now? I look back at myself and I think yes. Because let's be honest, I personally don't think I'm that much different now; I've been meaning to read this book I guess for most of my life, well teenage years and now adulthood but never ever got around to doing so.

Because let's be honest, I personally don't think I'm that much different now; Older? I would hope.

Confused and unsure? At times. I have days. I have my issues but then again I think everyone does. What is sane? Who defines what's "normal"?

Because I don't think I've ever been "normal" but does that make me crazy? Also what's wrong with a little madness? Do we have to all fit the same mold?

An interesting look in to a subject of which I have little knowledge. Susanna Kaysen shares her experience of living in a woman's mental institution for two years during the 's when she was 18 years old.

This was a very quick and easy read - the narrative is broken up with scanned documents from Susanna's case and she discusses what the doctors and nurses have to say about her.

I wasn't blown away by this novel- I think I just expected a little more from it. I found the topic to be very inter An interesting look in to a subject of which I have little knowledge.

I found the topic to be very interesting and I would love some recommendations for other books of this sort. I would recommend to any who have an interest in psychology and the treatment of mental health issues in the 's.

The fifth book in my project reading one book from each year of my life. I started this one last night, getting through 25 pages in the blink of an eye.

I read the next 75 pages this morning before eating breakfast, and finished it while playing Assassins Creed, cooking dinner, eating dinner, and then after dinner.

I also loved that the title is taken from the title of a pa 4. I also loved that the title is taken from the title of a painting!

There was a bit towards the end where it got a bit clinical and analytical but it ended strongly. The thrill is in the sauce.

Although Kaysen did find her confinement necessary, and voluntary, not all had such pleasures of paying royalty rent in places like McLean.

I applaud her story with bright and shiny details that paved prose and seamless chapters into a full day read with no need for a break.

Whatever the case, my main gripe with this book—that it follows that very unconnected structure and is told out of chronological order—can be justified by the simple fact that its intent is to disorient, and it achieves this end admirably.

For this being a memoir, Susanna seems incredibly distanced from—and even bored by—the events she describes.

The best chapters are the philosophical ones, where she ruminates on the nature of madness and the many ways it can manifest.

These, ultimately, are what redeemed the book and why it gets three stars from me. Susanna can be incredibly insightful and descriptive when she wants to be, but she mostly seems content skidding by on the surface of things without making any effort at character development, description, or tone-setting.

It is told plainly and with a flat affect, as disinterested as a tranquilised psychiatric patient, content to loll in a ratty easy chair and stare mindlessly at the TV.

There is no colour to this book. If I had to assign it a colour, it would be the colour of dryer lint, or bathroom walls in that specific tone of beige that must have been manufactured in purgatory to desiccate your very soul.

Perhaps this is all meant to give the reader the most realistic possible feeling of being confined in a mental institution in the s: the boredom, the listlessness, the lack of a unifying theme or plot.

While there were some entertaining parts, I found the whole book strangely cold and lacking. The author gives virtually no insights whatsoever into her own illnes, or really how she felt about the whole situation.

She came across a little like a spoilt ungrateful rich kid, which granted, at some point she does make a semi reference to. I could not really comprehend I what she was trying to do with this book,or who she was at all.

I felt like she was telling the stories of those ar Disappointing. I felt like she was telling the stories of those around her because she didn't want to talk about her own.

Her parents and life outside the hospital are barely even mentioned, it felt to me like very defensive writing.

You know, I'll write a book about my time in a mental hospital without actually writing about my time in in a mental hospital I can't understand the hype around this one at all.

The only thing I can put it down to, it's that the people that love it have not read many books about mental illness. Try " One flew over the cuckoos nest" or heck, even "Prozac nation" I've watched the movie multiple times, and loved it; but I'm sad to say this is one of the times that the movie adaption was far superior to the book.

I enjoyed the insight, and as someone with a BPD diagnosis I definitely recognised patterns of thought or behaviours that felt familiar to me, but I feel as if it didn't move me as much as I was hoping it would.

Reading this has definitely motivated me to look deeper into literature focusing on mental illness, and more specifically BPD, but for no I've watched the movie multiple times, and loved it; but I'm sad to say this is one of the times that the movie adaption was far superior to the book.

Reading this has definitely motivated me to look deeper into literature focusing on mental illness, and more specifically BPD, but for now I'm leaving this one with a rating of 3.

This probably wasn't the best book to read while currently trying to recover from mental illness, but I honestly just felt nothing for this book.

I felt like the attachment between the writer and the reader that is supposed to be there wasn't there at all.

I also couldn't understand some of the scans of the documents as the writing was ineligible, at least for me. Readers also enjoyed.

Biography Memoir. About Susanna Kaysen. Susanna Kaysen is an American author. Kaysen was born and raised in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Kaysen attended high school at the Commonwealth School in Boston and the Cambridge School before being sent to McLean Hospital in to undergo psychiatric treatment for depression.

It was there she was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. She was released after eighteen months.

She later drew Susanna Kaysen is an American author. She later drew on this experience for her memoir Girl, Interrupted , which was made into a film in , her role being played by Winona Ryder.

Her mother, deceased, was sister of architect Richard Neutra. Kaysen also has one sister and has been divorced at least once.

She lived for a time in the Faroe Islands, upon which experience her novel Far Afield is based. Books by Susanna Kaysen. Related Articles.

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Edit Storyline Unable to cope with reality and the difficulty that comes with it, 18 year old Susanna, is admitted to a mental institution in order to overcome her disorder.

Taglines: The crazy thing is, you're not crazy.

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