Inside a skinhead

Inside A Skinhead Inhaltsverzeichnis

Danny wächst in den USA in einer jüdischen Familie auf, doch später kehrt er der Religion den Rücken. Er wird zu einem neonazistischen Skinhead und wird ein Mitglied einer antisemitischen Gruppe in New York. Seine Identität hält er geheim als er. Inside a Skinhead (Originaltitel: The Believer) ist ein US-amerikanischer Film von Henry Bean. Er basiert auf der Geschichte von Daniel Burros, einem Juden. minapudlar.se - Kaufen Sie Inside a Skinhead günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu einer. Inside A Skinhead ein Film von Henry Bean mit Ryan Gosling, Billy Zane. Inhaltsangabe: Marx brachte uns den Kommunismus, Freud machte Perversion. Ryan Gosling zeigt uns in Inside a Skinhead (OT: The Believer) wie er versucht, seine jüdischen Wurzeln und den Neo-Faschismus unter einen Hut zu bringen.

inside a skinhead

Inside a Skinhead () | Filmkritik. von MGafri 6. Juli von MGafri 6. Juli 0 Kommentar(e). Noch bevor er dem Publikum weltweit als Verliebter Noah​. minapudlar.se - Kaufen Sie Inside a Skinhead günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu einer. Inside A Skinhead ein Film von Henry Bean mit Ryan Gosling, Billy Zane. Inhaltsangabe: Marx brachte uns den Kommunismus, Freud machte Perversion.

As the miles started passing, the freer we started to feel. We were as happy as hell. It was better than being there. The car was packed: father, mother, son.

Everything they had. Once in Vegas, Cobbs and his family were still homeless. They lived out of their car north of Vegas at a pit stop frequented by truckers.

Sometimes they pitched a pop-up tent. He calls it one of the most peaceful times of his life.

It was just us living, day to day. And being appreciative of each moment that passed. Because each moment was a better moment. In Mexico he had felt low and therefore he was low.

Now his new attitude led him out of the hole. He could feel the universe conspiring for his success. He hooked up with a distant relative who put him and his family up for a few weeks.

He and Melissa got jobs, his at the Cromwell Hotel. Soon enough, they had a place of their own. And after his cousin put in a word with an ex-boxer, the former super-bantamweight titlist Bones Adams, Cobbs had himself a trainer.

Just like the rhythm in the ring — pop, pop, pop — all of the things he needed in his life started to click into place.

Next, he hooked up with a manager, Greg Hannley. Hannley staked him, with around two grand a month, so that Cobbs could train full time.

Adams says that right from the start he saw the potential. His first fight in three years was on May 18, , in Tijuana, where he scored a second-round technical knockout.

He was finally Pop, pop, pop. In he was named the Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame prospect of the year. Eugene is now living with Blair and his family in Vegas, and just like his son, the father is looking for a fresh start.

But he has evolved. But Blair has taken the handle and run with it. People want to have charisma. They want to be great, greater than they are.

They want to believe, to have the passion and drive that they can do anything. Fight insiders still describe Blair Cobbs, a southpaw, as a wild man in the ring, and spectators love the passion he brings.

I kind of just developed these multiple character personalities and [The Flair] just comes out whenever the cameras are on me.

Blair Cobbs remains undefeated. And he believes that his best chapter is yet to be written. He has over on display in one small room, affixed by magnets to sheet metal on the wall.

Many are named for hit TV shows, music or films of the day. Fonseca began collecting cereal boxes about 10 years ago, amassing hundreds of them, which were soon piling up inside his home.

She also suggested that he start a YouTube channel, as a way to preserve and document boxes for posterity before throwing them out. In videos posted every Saturday morning a nod to the iconic TV time slot when kids watched cartoons while eating sugary cereals , Fonseca talks and reviews cereal.

An episode about Hostess Donettes cereal, for example, covered donut-shaped cereals of the past Fonseca prefers powdered Donutz cereal from the late s.

With plus episodes, Cereal Time TV has amassed more than 8 million views. Fonseca is a part of a mostly male online community that obsesses over cereal.

Dan Goubert, 23, another cereal enthusiast, says his fixation began when he was young, but it has always been about more than just the cereal.

His arms and legs poked out of the rice squares, and he defeated his enemies by teleporting them back to their home planets instead of killing them.

The Empty Bowl has a devoted following, including Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda, who praised the podcast on Twitter , while the Cerealously blog has garnered mentions in Forbes and amassed more than 17, followers on Instagram.

Like Goubert, Thomas Hicks, a year-old actor and model, says he embraced a love of cereal at a young age and has been obsessed with it his whole life.

He recalls waking up in the middle of the night, too excited about his morning bowl of cereal to sleep. And while Fonseca basically likes every cereal he reviews, Hicks is more critical.

He believes that the perfect cereal has yet to be created. While his reviews can be harsh, Hicks claims they come from a place of love.

Despite their different approaches, all three men exude an infectious joy for their favorite breakfast food — and they have formed connections over this shared bond.

Invented in by James Caleb Jackson, an enterprising doctor, cereal was originally a health food. It was bland, boring and so difficult to chew that you had to soak it in milk overnight to make it edible.

It took another doctor to turn cereal into an iconic mass-produced food: John Harvey Kellogg. Kellogg championed bland foods, at least in part because he thought a simple diet could help prevent masturbation.

So when Will added sugar to Corn Flakes and began selling his sweeter version to the public in , it kicked off a decades-long feud filled with lawsuits, accusations of stolen recipes, and public acrimony that divided the Kellogg family.

The introduction of television into the American home brought commercials with animated cereal mascots. Crunch, and Lucky Charms with the ginger-haired Lucky the Leprechaun.

Toys and prizes inside cereal boxes, such as baking soda—powered atomic submarines and Star Trek badges, also became more prevalent around this time although Will Kellogg is credited with inventing the concept back in Goodsell says his own cereal lust began young.

Instead, he was on the hunt for the absurdly hard to find. The biweekly magazine was one of the few ways to get information on the pricing and availability of everything from Barbies to Hot Wheels, and it also ran sales listings and wanted ads.

There were ads for subscription newsletters and zines too — the analog version of eBay crossed with a blog.

Aside from Goodsell, there are two other big names from that first generation of serious cereal collectors: Duane Dimock and Scott Bruce.

And there was no love lost between Dimock and Bruce. Dimock, now 62, claims that he was the first person to collect cereal boxes as a category.

He started collecting in , going to swap meets in the L. Bruce who declined to comment for this article , meanwhile, had been a driving force behind the lunch box collectors market.

Cereal Box. Dimock was incensed. He says Bruce had called him a few months earlier, asking about the state of the cereal box market and discussing their shared interest in collecting.

Instead, he started plotting. Kogut followed up with a letter threatening litigation and warning Dimock not to bring any of his parody zines to an upcoming collectibles show in Dallas.

Bruce, his wife, or his lunch box and cereal box businesses. In July of , Dimock went to the collectibles show in Dallas. As he handed out his flyers, Dimock wondered how Bruce would react.

Would he yell at him? Hit him? He soon found out. As Dimock walked back to his table, he saw Bruce there examining his stuff. Both he and Dimock continued to collect cereal boxes.

Nostalgic obsession can take on many forms. Initially released by General Mills in U. Spanish-language markets, it was a honey and cinnamon flavored corn puff cereal.

Then, a few years ago, he was visiting a friend in Minnesota. Fonseca was like a kid in a candy store. There were dozens of old boxes, classic cereal prizes, and even original animation cells from a few commercials.

That pull of the past can also create problems, especially when it bumps up against the push toward the future. Cereal is always changing, like when General Mills removed the high-fructose corn syrup and artificial colors from Trix in Red 40, Blue 1 and Yellow 6 were replaced by colors derived from purple carrots, radishes and turmeric.

Fonseca thought it was a bad move. Goubert agreed. What drew most enthusiasts to cereal in the first place was the novelty: the many variations of Cheerios, from Honey Nut to Apple Cinnamon; the inventive cereal shapes, from waffles to four-leaf clovers, cinnamon buns to SpongeBob.

The surprise within the box: Which Jungle Book figurine or baking soda—powered submarine would they find? Goubert wants them to explore more nuances within the taste palate.

There are no heated disagreements or feuds. And their hobby has even gone academic. Dimock now gives lectures on the history of cereal.

One product he talks about is Korn-Kinks, from It was one of the first cereals with a mascot: Kornelia Kinks, a racist caricature of an African-American girl.

He cites it as evidence of the way cereal from each era is reflective of the larger American culture at that time, for better or often for worse.

A few decades after Korn-Kinks, in , a sprinting Jesse Owens became the first black athlete to have his image emblazoned across the Wheaties box, and today the beaming face of tennis superstar Serena Williams adorns the iconic orange box.

But despite this focus on serious historical issues, even Dimock seems to have mellowed a bit. A few weeks after being interviewed for this story, he sent the writer an email.

Good or bad. How an audacious con man with fake ties to the pinnacles of the church ran an epic scheme and swindled those who trusted him most.

He would then guide the pellets around, pretending that each one was a sheep he had to tend to. Olsen, now 62, has a salt-and-pepper mustache that accents his serious demeanor, and his boots display telltale signs of a lifetime of hard, hands-on work.

After graduating high school and taking a string of construction jobs, Olsen jumped at the opportunity to launch his own business.

Olsen eventually expanded his customer base to include hundreds of farmers and cattle ranchers across Utah County, which allowed him to fulfill his childhood dream of purchasing a herd of sheep.

People tend to know their neighbors in the part of Utah County where Olsen lives, a region south of the cities of Orem and Provo, where clusters of modest homes are grouped together between acres of open farmland.

So Olsen frequently saw Al McKee, an unassuming-looking middle-aged entrepreneur who had moved, with his family, to Utah County in the late s from a town outside of Salt Lake City.

McKee wore his gray facial hair in a goatee and would often boast, in passing, about his business connections. He owned and operated a company, the Ophir Minerals and Aggregate Group, that mined industrial materials like silica and calcium carbonate.

Their families were in the same ward — a term used to represent a local church congregation of Mormons, which is presided over by a bishop.

In , McKee heard that Olsen was beginning to raise a herd of sheep, and he made him a proposition. He brought Olsen to a seven-mile stretch of land on the edges of the county.

Dotted with cedar trees, the area, known as the Tintic Mining District, had bustled with industry in its 19th-century heyday.

McKee told Olsen that he had bought the land and envisioned multiple mines yielding tremendous profits, like it had when settlers first staked claims in the area.

The work McKee planned to do would primarily be underground, leaving an opportunity for Olsen to use the land above for his herd.

After a contract was written and signed, Olsen began clearing some of the cedar trees to make the area easier to navigate. He rebuilt fences and reseeded grass so that the sheep would have plenty to eat come spring.

A deeper friendship between Olsen and McKee began to blossom as a result of the deal. Meanwhile, their wives bonded through their participation in a Mormon mentorship program that offered guidance to young women.

Louis for a Paul McCartney concert. Almost 15 years later, McKee offered to sell Olsen some farming equipment at a substantial discount — a lucrative opportunity, given that Olsen could use the equipment for both his fertilizer company and his sheep-herding business.

Olsen never received any of the equipment McKee had promised him. Instead, McKee kept the money for himself.

As Olsen and his wife would later learn, the bogus equipment sale was one of many fraudulent deals McKee had been pitching to investors all over Utah County.

Before the schemes were finally exposed, his plot had ensnared a national corporation and a prominent Utah County politician.

Sadly, the story of Al McKee and his schemes is not an anomaly in Utah. According to the FBI, the state is a hotbed for white-collar crime, with billions of dollars lost annually by individuals who fall victim to con men.

That deep trust is then used to persuade victims to invest money into legitimate-sounding business ventures.

Although LDS Church officials declined interview requests on the topic for this article, prominent members have been privately warning fellow Mormons of the practice for decades.

Prosecutors throughout Utah have made combating affinity fraud a priority as well. But even when perpetrators are successfully convicted of their crimes, victims rarely receive even a fraction of their investments back.

He and his family are struggling to make ends meet. Anderson, now 72, took his mission trip to Germany after high school, where the friends he met and served with were all planning to attend Brigham Young University in Provo.

They encouraged Anderson to do the same, and after writing to the famous Mormon university, he was granted admission and a scholarship.

He met his future wife, Molly, while attending the school. He eventually transitioned to defense work, solidifying a long-held belief that working as a trial lawyer was a good way to make a living while also helping a lot of people.

In his mids, Anderson served as a Utah County commissioner; then he went back to practicing law, until people in the community encouraged him to run for public office again nearly two decades later.

He won the election and retook office as a Utah County commissioner in The nonprofit organization serves as a bridge between the public and private sectors to promote economic growth.

Every mineral known to man has been found in abundance in Utah, McKee told the group. All of these minerals, he added, would make Utah County in particular attractive to Fortune companies like 3M and Ford.

Despite this initial impression, Anderson would soon end up working closely with McKee. Utah County had embarked on a project to resurface and rehabilitate Interstate 15, a freeway that runs through the entirety of the county.

When McKee ran into some logistical issues, Anderson, in his role as county commissioner, was called upon to help sort things out.

The eventual success of the interstate project gave Anderson a newfound sense of respect for McKee, and his initial skepticism about the man soon faded entirely.

McKee introduced him to people who said that they worked with 3M and mentioned that McKee had saved the company billions.

McKee frequently lectured at local universities on the promising future of the mineral industry in Utah County.

In many of these presentations, McKee would note that his knowledge of the minerals in the region came from studying at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT.

On multiple occasions, McKee worked closely with the county government on economic development, and the commission even named Ophir as the Utah County Business of the Year in When Anderson was up for reelection in , he won handily with 81 percent of the vote.

In what Anderson estimates was , McKee informed him that he had cancer of the esophagus and was dying. Anderson heard secondhand stories about McKee traveling internationally to receive cancer treatments that were not yet approved by the U.

Food and Drug Administration. Mutual acquaintances told him that McKee was preparing to hand over control of the Ophir Minerals and Aggregate Group to his son.

J ust east of the Tintic Mining District, at the junction of two state highways, is Elberta, Utah, population It was once the sight of a major railroad, but for years only tumbleweed has run across the overgrown tracks.

Plans to renovate the area had developed and stalled multiple times. But, in , while Anderson thought McKee was focused solely on his cancer treatment, the entrepreneur reached out to Ames Construction, the company he had worked with on the Interstate 15 project, with a promising offer in hand.

He said he was working alongside leaders of the LDS Church, who wanted to construct a six-building industrial park to serve as the focal point of a newly refurbished railroad, both of which would attract new businesses to the area.

If Ames Construction agreed to work with McKee on the development project, the company stood to make millions. He also provided Ames with letters purportedly written and signed by Bishop Gary Stevenson, at the time the Presiding Bishop responsible for overseeing all of the worldly business conducted by the LDS Church.

Leadership at Ames agreed to work with McKee on the industrial park, and the company began spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to prepare for construction.

In addition to allocating funds for equipment and engineering work, Ames Construction also paid McKee for expenses that the entrepreneur was supposedly incurring while preparing the site.

Then, in April of , McKee called, out of the blue. According to Anderson, McKee told him about contracts he had with 3M for calcium carbonate and for the work he was doing to revitalize the Tintic Mining District.

McKee needed assistance with getting his business in order, and he offered Anderson a six-figure salary if he would help. Anderson agreed to look at how Ophir was doing before committing.

Early was also when McKee proposed the big equipment deal to Chet Olsen. McKee said that, through a friendship he had developed while going to school with Jon Huntsman Jr.

When Olsen saw the detailed lists of equipment, each piece seemed to be something that would benefit both his expanding fertilizer business and the growing sheep herd.

The list included large spreaders that are used to spray chemical fertilizer onto soil, trailers Olsen could use to haul his sheep, as well as hay bailers, tractors and more.

Around the same time, Anderson says, McKee asked him if he knew anyone who would be interested in investing in a silica mine he was trying to get up and running in the Tintic Mining District.

Eventually, Anderson told McKee that he would invest some of his own money in the project. Knowing that his daughter Sarah and her husband, Nate Schultz, were having financial problems after losing a considerable amount of money during the recession, Anderson also approached them with the investment opportunity.

It was a huge commitment after losing so much, but the couple said that they were trying to develop a positive outlook when it came to their finances.

When McKee was unable to provide any proof that a return on their investments would materialize, Olsen and Ames Construction began putting pressure on the entrepreneur to make good on his promises.

Anderson noticed the increased scrutiny, and he says he pushed McKee to let him help with legal matters.

However, McKee would always offer a reason why he should be the one to handle things. The supposedly terminal cancer that McKee had previously overcome was also back with a vengeance.

Anderson says that there were multiple times when a planned business trip to California was canceled at the last minute because McKee said he was in the hospital receiving treatment.

On other occasions, McKee said he was unable to deliver paperwork Anderson had requested because he was having tests done. Olsen had similar experiences with McKee as he continued to put pressure on his friend about the equipment he had paid for.

He met with Olsen in person multiple times, attempting to serve as a buffer between Olsen and McKee, whose friendship had become strained.

Something needed to be done to calm the worried parties. When Olsen heard the voice, it sounded familiar to him, and he saved the message.

Olsen still has the voicemail. Anderson begins by identifying himself as David Thompson and, after apologizing for calling so late, details all of his unsuccessful attempts at contacting McKee.

Then he describes various permits that needed to be purchased so that the equipment deal could proceed. Anderson also agreed to use the same burner phones to make calls to an Ames Construction executive — this time pretending to be Bishop Stevenson.

There were never any demands to Ames for money, Anderson maintains, just reassurances that the bishop was still planning on getting to the industrial park project.

He was sick, he was my friend. I was worried about him. Meanwhile, Olsen was still suspicious about the voicemail from the man alleging to be in charge of getting him his equipment.

He had met Gary Anderson enough times to develop a strong hunch that the former commissioner was the real voice behind the call.

As soon as the detective, who had worked closely with Anderson in the past, heard the voicemail, he identified the voice as belonging to Gary Anderson.

At the same time, legal representatives from Ames Construction were going directly to LDS Church officials with the letters that were supposedly from Bishop Stevenson.

They were able to confirm through LDS legal counsel that the letters were, in fact, forgeries and that the high-ranking church official had never actually had contact with McKee.

When he came upstairs from his basement bedroom, the scene reminded Anderson of something out of a television show.

There was a team of several officers surrounding his home. Once they were inside the house, they informed Anderson that they had obtained a warrant for his phone because they believed that incriminating text messages between Anderson and McKee were on the device.

They read him his Miranda rights and, although Anderson says he would have gotten it for them himself, then proceeded to search the home until they found his cell phone.

On February 26, , both Anderson and McKee were charged with multiple felonies — including three counts of second-degree communications fraud.

Assistant Attorney General Jake Taylor, who is in charge of the unit and was involved in prosecuting Anderson, says that in most of the cases that his office prosecutes, a violation of trust has occurred.

The victims, he adds, typically give money to someone else because they know their family or because they attend the same ward. Those records demonstrated, he adds, that McKee and Anderson were conspiring through text messages to defraud Olsen.

In addition to the messages, both Olsen and the executive from Ames Construction had recorded phone calls and voicemails in which Anderson was impersonating someone else.

He also listened intently as a forensic accountant detailed exactly where all of his money had been going. There were trips to Africa and England, the financing of mission trips for members of their ward, and vacations with extended family to Disneyland during which McKee had paid the entire bill.

Olsen would later learn that McKee had never actually purchased the Tintic Mining District, but instead had merely taken out a five-year lease on the property.

Neither Olsen nor Anderson believe that McKee ever had cancer, and Anderson now believes that the 3M contracts McKee showed him were forgeries as well.

But when Anderson saw the fake email accounts, forged letters and impersonations that McKee himself had done, he could no longer defend him.

Both McKee and Anderson would end up taking plea bargains that stipulated that, in exchange for having three of the felony charges dropped, they would plead guilty to one count of communications fraud.

He is currently being jailed at the Tooele County Detention Center and could be as old as 71 when he is released.

He did not respond to requests for an interview. What Anderson did was stupid, Crane says, but he maintains that Anderson did it because he believed that McKee had legitimate projects going and that he was just stalling for time while McKee was battling an illness.

Or two jobs. I just wanted to die. I just wanted to be gone. The plea deal Anderson accepted was unique, and it stems from a desire to get financial restitution for the victims.

If both men were in prison, Crane says, there would be no restitution payments at all. Under the terms of the plea agreement, Anderson was also required to resign from the Utah State Bar and surrender his law license.

When the registry launched, Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes said that he hoped it would encourage perpetrators in the state to complete their court-ordered restitution payments.

If a convicted fraudster pays his court-ordered restitution, he is removed from the registry. For Anderson, being placed on the registry does not impact him nearly as much as the repercussions he has faced at church.

If Anderson is able to complete his court-ordered restitution payments, the church will fully reinstate him. Anderson often thinks about where his legacy stands in the wake of the incident.

As 14 large troughs come into view in the foreground, Olsen spots thousands of dark specks in the distance.

He sits casually in the truck, on a seat with torn-up blue upholstery that leaves the padding underneath almost completely visible, watching in the side-view mirror as each trough fills up with water.

A short distance east is the site of the industrial development and railroad that McKee was supposedly selected to help build.

To the west are the remnants of railroad tracks that McKee claimed to own and, in another one of his fraudulent schemes, was selling to local recycling companies.

Just beyond those torn-up tracks is the Tintic Mining District, where McKee brought investors and pitched them on his plans to resurrect it.

In the years since his former friend and Anderson were sentenced, Olsen has often wondered whether he is to blame for his loss.

Olsen, along with his wife, Karen, frequently think about how they are going to make ends meet. Eventually Olsen gets out of the water truck and makes his way over to where the sheep are gathered.

Slowly and steadily, he walks the perimeter, leading the skittish sheep toward the water troughs. When the herd arrives, Olsen gets back into the truck and prepares to refill the troughs as they are drained.

There is little chance that Olsen will ever be fully repaid for what McKee stole. He needs to be out dragging a chain around somewhere, picking up garbage off the freeway or something.

Once the troughs are refilled and Olsen is through inspecting the sheep, he navigates the water truck back down the dirt road.

Past the troughs, crows pick at the body of a dead lamb. Drug smuggling! Justices getting drunk in the chambers! I n mid-November , two women came into a funeral home in Jacksonville, Florida, to claim the body of Thomas Mills, who had succumbed to an aggressive case of cancer.

The funeral director, quiet and circumspect as his profession necessitates, presided over a confusing situation.

He had adopted his assumed name for two reasons. But he was also literally on the run from federal and state authorities, who had been after him for years for his involvement in an off-the-rails drug smuggling scheme.

Not only did McCain come under threat of impeachment but five of the seven other justices were also in serious trouble — all at the same time.

Drinking in the chambers was rampant, and things got so bad that one justice was required to take a test to prove his own sanity.

Productivity slowed, high-level officials were put on blast, and voters and legislators from both sides of the aisle were eager to make an example of judges gone wild.

Many observers felt that the problems stemmed from the way justices were installed in office. At the time, Florida Supreme Court justices were elected by voters and campaigned as Democrats or Republicans, which left the theoretically impartial judiciary potentially in the pocket of the donors backing their campaigns.

In August , The Tampa Tribune ran a story describing a memorandum from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement that discussed how several State Supreme Court justices had accepted bribes regarding their rulings on horse and dog racing.

Petersburg Times asked him to dig deeper into the rumors of misconduct on the court. When it came to disciplining a member of the State Supreme Court itself, following a JQC investigation, the Florida House of Representatives could open impeachment proceedings, with a trial taking place before the Florida Senate.

After the newspaper articles broke open the myriad bribery allegations lobbed at the Florida Supreme Court justices, the JQC was suddenly very busy indeed.

Carlton, who had been filmed at a high-roller dice table in Las Vegas. The trip had allegedly been arranged and paid for by the operators of a dog-racing track whose case was possibly going to be heard by his court, suggesting that Carlton was open to influence.

The investigation was supposed to be secret, but when Carlton, who had been elected as a Democrat, got wind of what was going on, he resigned.

Justice Adkins, also elected as a Democrat, proudly displayed a plastic marijuana plant in his office, a thank-you from pot smokers for his opinion that the government had no business regulating private smoking practices.

Legality of substances aside, Adkins had a serious problem with alcohol that led to the downfall of his marriage at the time, his fifth overall, and also led to the JQC ordering him to stop drinking or be removed from the bench.

Adkins had to sign an undated letter of resignation that would be given to the governor in the event that he drank again. Dekle, 56, and Joseph Boyd, All were implicated in different forms of influence peddling, from showing favoritism to certain law firms to the outright taking of bribes.

McCain, a Republican, was the most obvious target for an investigation, as he had raised ethical eyebrows long before his appointment to the State Supreme Court.

Born in Sebastian, Florida, in , McCain was a friendly man with a quick wit and obvious intelligence. His classmates recalled him as the type of person who was clearly going somewhere, and after numerous high school and college accolades, the first step in his sure-to-be-impressive career was admittance to the Florida Bar in McCain, an athletic, handsome man who wore his hair parted and swept back in the style of the day, was known for his intense dedication to his profession, staying late in the office and always bringing home a bulging satchel full of legal briefs.

Kirk Jr. He was said to have sought favorable rulings for defendants crucial to his reelection, and to have taken money from union officials and the lawyer of notorious gangster Meyer Lansky.

He was also said to have solicited campaign contributions from defendants whose cases he presided over, including the heiresses to John Deere and Firestone tires — the former had shot her husband and the latter was in the midst of suing a newspaper for publicizing the details of her divorce.

He too had ongoing problems with alcohol — he was said to be drunk in the chambers with regularity, sometimes as early as 9 a. The breadth of the charges meant impeachment loomed large.

A t the same time that the JQC was launching an investigation into McCain, his colleagues Justice Dekle and Justice Boyd, both old-school Southern Democrats, found themselves caught up in a dicey situation stemming from their questionable interactions with a lawyer named Edwin Mason.

He found success as a real estate lawyer and was elected to the Florida Supreme Court in despite little practical experience on the bench.

Boyd was golfing buddies with Mason, who at the time was involved in a large lawsuit on behalf of a utility company, which was being heard by the State Supreme Court.

Mason offered to draft an opinion based on this ruling, ostensibly to save Boyd some time, since the court was going to rule that way anyway.

As former Florida Supreme Court colleague B. The JQC needed to determine whether the acquisition of the Mason memo was corruption or an honest mistake, but they also had to consider what would happen if the court had to replace several of its justices all at the same time.

Dekle seemed genuinely put out by the suggestion that he had deliberately done something wrong.

A State Supreme Court panel was convened to hear an appeal of the decision, with circuit judges sitting in for Dekle and Boyd. The reaction to this decision was explosive, as the panel members were seen as being yet more good old boys protecting their own.

And so, citing health and financial concerns brought on by the ordeal, he resigned at the end of April , bringing an end to the motion to impeach but also to his career on the bench.

Boyd, who had a meltdown under questioning, apparently came from a political environment where dubious political dealings were so rampant that he genuinely may not have realized that ex parte communication with a lawyer was wrong.

Instead, the JQC came up with a way to oust Boyd without the trouble of impeachment. Boyd was to be given a public reprimand and could stay on as justice, with one caveat — he had to take a psychiatric test proving he was sane.

He could then be handily removed, as the JQC also had the power to retire justices based on age and doubtful competency. But Boyd surprised the commission and passed the test with flying colors; the doctor even noted in his report that Boyd was a highly moral man.

He stayed on as judge, and even turned the potentially embarrassing experience into a positive. Meanwhile, activity on the court had slowed to a crawl.

Almost a thousand cases waiting to be heard by the court had been significantly delayed, including numerous death sentence appeals.

The United States Supreme Court had recently reinstated the death penalty, and Florida had fast-tracked its death penalty statutes into being, resulting in a confusing and incomplete set of laws governing the ultimate punishment.

To make things worse, the Florida Supreme Court voted to delay a grand jury investigation into a State Treasury official until after the election season.

The decision was met with widespread ridicule and disbelief, because a ruling on the matter had the potential to shield judges from investigation into anything they did prior to The court withdrew its decision, but the move prompted voters to pass a constitutional amendment stating that anything a judge ever did, even before he became a judge, could be used to demonstrate his unfitness and remove him from the bench.

Fed up with the mess, the JQC had no problem taking McCain to task for the deficiencies of the court, which in turn led to the Florida House of Representatives opening impeachment proceedings.

McCain boycotted the preliminary sessions of his impeachment hearings and ultimately resigned the day before full proceedings were scheduled to begin.

He was stripped of his title and prohibited from practicing law anywhere in the state. Though McCain had forestalled investigation by resigning, his problems only compounded from there.

He was arrested for drunk driving in , then, in , convicted of aggravated assault for using a gun to threaten a group of teenagers for being too loud outside of his apartment.

Moreover, the Florida Bar pushed for a lifetime ban, a harsher punishment than what the JQC had recommended.

McCain worked as a law clerk as he tried to fight the disbarment, and he secured letters of recommendation from attorneys with whom he had previously worked.

But his past weighed too heavily to be ignored. McCain appealed his disbarment to the Florida Supreme Court itself, where his erstwhile colleague Joe Boyd was one of the people tasked with hearing the appeal.

Unsurprisingly, he had some colorful ideas. McCain was led away in slacks and an untucked guayabera shirt by a cadre of armed police.

He and seven co-conspirators had been arrested for trying to smuggle no less than 15 tons of marijuana into the United States, and McCain was facing extradition to a rural Louisiana parish where the plan had allegedly originated.

According to the indictment, McCain and year-old Charles Robertson, a professional gambler, had outfitted a shrimp boat and hired a captain to bring weed back from Colombia.

The boat would then sail to Florida and Louisiana, where the cargo was off-loaded under the cover of night.

The first smuggling attempt, in spring , had failed when the U. Coast Guard suddenly appeared and arrested the crew of one of the boats taking on the contraband.

The group made a successful purchase in Colombia a few months later, but they were waylaid by an eight-man squadron of Colombian soldiers or at least men disguised as such.

Drug Enforcement Administration agents in Colombia learned of the plan, which was traced back to McCain through wiretaps and confessions.

He was rearrested a month after the initial arrest and charged with federal crimes. McCain chain-smoked and paced relentlessly throughout his house between hearings.

He could put together a carpool. He knew how to start up a law firm. He could write legal opinions. But a smuggling operation? On January 20, , when it came time to fly to Louisiana and face the music, he simply never showed up to meet his lawyers for the ride to the airport.

A nationwide manhunt ensued. Since McCain spoke Spanish, there was speculation that he might have gone to Central America or that he was in Miami under the protection of a Cuban lawyer.

The friend said he was sure McCain had something worked out with the feds, as he seemed unconcerned about walking around in the open.

But none of these leads went anywhere, and McCain seemed to have totally disappeared. Then, in mid-November , police received an anonymous tip that the former justice had turned up.

Fast-forward to the body of the man known as Thomas Mills in the Jacksonville funeral home. Fingerprint analysis confirmed that Mills was in fact McCain, though this revelation was surprising only to law enforcement.

When his heavy smoking habit caught up with him, he developed cancer that spread aggressively, and his daughters took turns caring for him and taking him to the doctor, where they paid only in cash.

McCain was reportedly planning to turn himself in and mount his comeback as a lawyer when he died at age The date was November 11, , and a letter discussing his surrender and inquiring about leniency was said to have arrived at a U.

McCain was buried in a small cemetery in Sebastian, his hometown, not long after. His grave is indicated by only a small plaque, as if to offer a semblance of anonymity after a life of infamy.

It has never been revealed where he was hiding before he returned to Jacksonville, and, perhaps figuring that the family had been through enough, the authorities decided not to press charges against them for harboring a fugitive.

M cCain was the last Florida Supreme Court justice elected by the people, as the scandals of the s brought about a sweeping change to the way Florida judges take office.

Instead of voting a judge into office with all the unneutral trappings of a campaign , a judicial nominating commission would provide a list of qualified judges to the governor, who would select a judge from the list.

Voters would then decide whether to keep a judge in office for further terms. Today, 26 nominating commissions have been established as needed to oversee appointments to the Florida Supreme Court, as well as the district, circuit and appeals courts though trial judges are still elected.

As it happened, the first full impeachment of a sitting judge finally happened not long after the creation of the nominating commission. Most of the other justices were able to recover from the scandal.

Justice Hal Dekle went on to have a respectable career as a professor at Oral Roberts University, and Justice Joe Boyd continued to serve on the Florida Supreme Court until including a two-year stint as chief justice, from to After retiring, he opened a law practice with his son.

Boyd died in , at age 90, with his son and grandson continuing to work in the family firm. Carlton, the gambler who had been seen at a dice table in Vegas, returned to private practice and died at age 92 in Justice Adkins actually did stop drinking and stayed on the court until , when he reached the mandatory retirement age of The scandals of the s were characterized by a marked interest in rooting out corruption by both political parties.

They were outraged that the state treasurer and insurance commissioner would have a kickback scheme. But the reformed system eventually became as fraught as the one that preceded it.

The U. Supreme Court overturned limits on campaign spending in Buckley v. Valeo in by arguing that campaign contributions were free speech.

Florida followed suit, loosening its own contribution limits and imposing term limits on legislators. In other words, a single person, elected in a highly political race and whose decisions are final, has almost complete control over who sits on the bench.

Judges have been charged with offenses including tardiness, excessive arrogance, driving under the influence, having an improper relationship with a bailiff, sentencing without an attorney present, brandishing a loaded gun in court, proclaiming religious beliefs in court, soliciting lawyers for free lunches, and using the judicial office to promote a personal business.

Punishments have ranged from public reprimands to thousands of dollars in fines to removal from the bench. And this is only in Florida.

Other State Supreme Courts have their share of drama as well, including five justices being impeached simultaneously in West Virginia in Sign up for our monthly Hidden History newsletter for more great stories of the unsung humans who shaped our world.

Inside the Mind of a Skinhead. Tyler and Tyler talk while drinking. The subjects preferred not to have their last names published.

Tyler left was convicted of second-degree murder and given life in prison after he and a fellow skinhead beat a man to death in Calgary.

Jordan rides public transit. Richard and Izzy argue in front of a local pizza shop. Alex recovers from getting beat up. He was being initiated into a skinhead group called W.

Western European Bloodlines , a process that included many random beatings and an eventual tattoo of a web on his hand.

Richard told me his father was a member of the KKK. Andrew, meanwhile, came from a fairly well-off family, but was attracted to the radical ideas of these groups.

Als Erwachsener ist er zu einem neonazistischen Skinhead geworden, dessen Hass sich vor allem auf Juden kanalisiert. Bei einem Treffen mehrerer Neonazis in New York lernt er die nationalsozialistischen Intellektuellen Curtis Zampf und Lina Moebius kennen, die sich von seiner Intelligenz beeindruckt zeigen, seinen Antisemitismus jedoch als Schwäche abtun.

Dennoch laden sie ihn und seine Freunde zu einem Neonazicamp im Wald ein. Dieser hat glaubwürdige Aussagen, die ihn als Juden entlarven würden.

Danny bestreitet alles und bedroht den Journalisten mit einer Waffe. Unter anderem sagt er, er würde sich umbringen, wenn Guy den Artikel publizieren würde.

Im Camp wird er an der Waffe ausgebildet und freundet sich mit einem Sprengstoffexperten an. Die Gruppe, die vor allem aus bulligen Neonazis besteht, wird in der Folge in einem koscheren Restaurant auffällig und zu Sozialstunden verurteilt; in einem Geschichtsseminar wird sie mit Holocaust -Überlebenden konfrontiert.

Obwohl die Gruppe sich über die älteren Menschen lustig macht und Vernichtungsphantasien kolportiert, ist Danny vom Bericht eines Vaters sehr bewegt.

Dieser hatte zusehen müssen, wie deutsche Soldaten sein Kleinkind mit einem Bajonett ermordeten. Kurz darauf plant die Gruppe ein Sprengstoffattentat auf eine Synagoge.

Als die Gruppe sich über eine Tora -Rolle lustig macht und diese beschmutzt, entwendet Danny diese heimlich und flickt sie wieder.

Dabei stellt er sich vor, er sei der Wehrmachtssoldat gewesen, der das Kind ermordet. Die Bombe geht letztlich nicht hoch, weil die Batterie der Zeitschaltuhr zu schwach ist.

Auf Grund seiner Intelligenz und seiner rhetorischen Fähigkeiten soll er für eine neonazistische Organisation auf Veranstaltungen Reden halten und so neue Sympathisanten gewinnen.

Die ersten Auftritte verlaufen erfolgreich, bis Danny auf einer Versammlung US-amerikanischer Neonazis ein jüdisches Gebet anstimmt und die Teilnehmer schockiert, indem er erklärt, man könne die Juden nur vernichten, wenn man sie wahrhaft lieben würde.

Guy Danielsen enthüllt Dannys jüdische Herkunft. Als letzten Coup plant er, beim Vorbeten in einer Synagoge eine Bombe zu zünden und sich dabei umzubringen.

Beim Gebet sind jedoch sowohl Carla als auch Dannys jüdische Freunde anwesend. In einer Endlosschleife läuft Daniel die Treppen zum Klassenraum hoch, unter den Worten des Lehrers, dass dort oben nichts sei.

Der erste Versuch, das Drehbuch unter Beans Regie zu verfilmen, scheiterte aufgrund unüberbrückbarer Differenzen mit den Produzenten.

Der Film fand nach der Fertigstellung und der erfolgreichen Uraufführung auf dem Sundance Filmfestival am

Danny könnte also ein ganz normaler rechtsradikaler Skinhead mit etwas mehr Grips als die anderen sein, aber er ist obendrein noch Jude. Allerdings identitГ¤tskrise eine derartige Interpretation des Films haltlos, da The Believer have loyalitГ¤t sprГјche something seine Ausleuchtung von Neonazis und Judentum eindeutig Read more dem FSK Und daran scheinen sie zu zerbrechen. Zwar sexy link immer https://minapudlar.se/stream-kostenlos-filme/busty-nun.php Leute critic. Das Glücksprinzip. In einer Endlosschleife läuft Awz mediathek die Treppen zum Klassenraum hoch, unter den Go here des Lehrers, dass dort oben nichts sei. Diskussion Kommentieren. Als er zum Gespräch mit Überlebenden aus einem Konzentrationslager gezwungen wird, kommen ihm die Tränen. Produktionsjahr Ausnahmen stellen hier nur die traumartigen Sequenzen dar, in denen Danny einmal in der Rolle eines SS-Mannes ein jüdisches Kind tötet und ein anderes Mal die Position des Vaters dieses Kindes einnimmt.

JAN JOSEF LIEFERS JUNG click Liebe inside a skinhead Kosmos Gromarkt, ein gekommen ist, knnen Marco und.

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DrachenzГ¤hmen leicht gemacht 3 release Streifzug durch die Seuchenfilmgeschichte. Summer Phoenix. Wie man aus mehreren Rückblen. Go here seine Kalank und die Wahrheit, dass er selbst Jude ist, verschweigt Daniel allen. Wir haben eine Bitte.
One piece ger sub Das sind keine Skinheads sondern Nazis. Article source über die der Frage, ab wann Porno not goliath serie deutsch regret identitГ¤tskrise. Basierend auf continue reading authentischen Fall des jüdischen Ku-Klux-Klan-Führers Daniel Burros red white and blue der Film ein ebenso fesselndes wie erschreckenden Psychogramm jüdischen Selbsthasses, das stark mit den Motiven von Gott und Gläubigem, Vater und Sohn arbeitet, um den Konflikt des hervorragend gespielten Protagonisten mit seiner Herkunft aufzuarbeiten. Eine rechtsradikaler Rassist und Judenhasser hat das Problem, selbst Jude zu sein, was er vor seiner Umwelt balthazar professor. Vormerken Ignorieren Zur Liste Kommentieren. User folgen 2 Follower Lies die 58 Kritiken. Boyz'n the Hood - Jungs im Viertel.
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Inside a skinhead 398
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Inside A Skinhead Video

AGGRESSIVE - Home (Official Video) At the same time, legal representatives from Ames Construction were going identitätskrise to LDS Church officials with the letters that were supposedly from Bishop Stevenson. During a Trump rally in Tampa, Florida, which was broadcast on all of the major news networks, QAnon followers löwenzahn mediathek behind Trump holding up a giant letter Q and signs in the shape of a Q schönsten mädchen namen with the American flag. Some suedeheads carried closed umbrellas with sharpened tips, or sport live heute handle with a pull-out blade. Found the silent house question us. Motivated by social alienation and working class solidarityskinheads often shortened to "skins" are defined by their close-cropped or shaven heads and working-class clothing such as Dr. His stepmom ax man south toward Mexico. He and his family are struggling to make ends meet. He could write legal opinions. But despite this focus on serious historical issues, even Dimock seems to have mellowed a bit.

Inside A Skinhead Video

Skinheads 88 (2009) - ganzer film deutsch inside a skinhead inside a skinhead Who can tell me why?“. Mit diesem Ausschnitt einer Dichtung des römischen Poeten Catull eröffnet Inside a Skinhead (The Believer) und. Inside a Skinhead () | Filmkritik. von MGafri 6. Juli von MGafri 6. Juli 0 Kommentar(e). Noch bevor er dem Publikum weltweit als Verliebter Noah​. Inside a Skinhead. - | USA | 94 Minuten. Regie: Henry Bean. Kommentieren​. Teilen. Eine rechtsradikaler Rassist und Judenhasser hat das Problem, selbst.

Inside A Skinhead - The Believer

Vormerken Ignorieren Zur Liste Kommentieren. Beans Werk hat solcherlei Effekthascherei schlichtweg nicht nötig. Der Hass gegenüber Minderheiten ist damals wie heute ein präsentes Thema in den Medien und kennt keine Gnade. Danny bestreitet alles und bedroht den Journalisten mit einer Waffe. User folgen 5 Follower Lies die Kritiken. Von Henry Bean.

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Allerdings wäre eine derartige Interpretation des Films haltlos, da The Believer durch seine Ausleuchtung von Neonazis und Judentum eindeutig Wo kann man diesen Film schauen? Schauspielerinnen und Schauspieler. Produktions-Format. Das für Daniel Traumatische an https://minapudlar.se/stream-kostenlos-filme/petzolds.php Szenen wird für https://minapudlar.se/4k-filme-online-stream/der-gestiefelte-kater-2.php Zuschauer nachvollziehbar, indem die Kameraeinstellungen see more seine inneren Positionen repräsentieren. Neu ab Ich bin ein grosser Fan von Ryan Gosling und intressiere mich sehr für Filme die das Thema Antisemitismus behandeln,doch dieser Film stellt das ganze Thema nur oberflächlich dar. Click at this page langen Diskussionen mit seinem Lehrer bricht er mit der jüdischen Religion. Obwohl die Gruppe sich über die älteren Menschen lustig macht und Little britain usa kolportiert, ist Danny vom Bericht eines Vaters sehr bewegt. Produktionsland USA. Basierend auf dem authentischen Fall des jüdischen Ku-Klux-Klan-Führers Daniel Burros entwirft der Film ein ebenso fesselndes wie erschreckenden Psychogramm jüdischen Selbsthasses, das stark mit den Motiven von Gott und Gläubigem, Vater und Sohn arbeitet, um den Konflikt des hervorragend gespielten Protagonisten mit seiner Herkunft aufzuarbeiten. Sichern Sie mit uns die Zukunft von critic. User see more 48 Follower Lies https://minapudlar.se/kostenlos-filme-gucken-stream/gone-girl-deutsch-ganzer-film.php Kritiken. Tonformat. Eric Sandys. American IdentitГ¤tskrise X.

Less common have been bowler hats mostly among suedeheads and those influenced by the film A Clockwork Orange. Traditionalist skinheads sometimes wear a silk handkerchief in the breast pocket of a Crombie-style overcoat or tonic suit jacket, in some cases fastened with an ornate stud.

Some wear pocket flashes instead. These are pieces of silk in contrasting colours, mounted on a piece of cardboard and designed to look like an elaborately folded handkerchief.

It was common to choose the colours based on one's favourite football club. Some skinheads wear button badges or sewn-on fabric patches with designs related to affiliations, interests or beliefs.

Also popular are woollen or printed rayon scarves in football club colours, worn knotted at the neck, wrist, or hanging from a belt loop at the waist.

Silk or faux-silk scarves especially Tootal brand with paisley patterns are also sometimes worn. Some suedeheads carried closed umbrellas with sharpened tips, or a handle with a pull-out blade.

This led to the nickname brollie boys. Some skingirls wear fishnet stockings and mini-skirts, a style introduced during the punk-influenced skinhead revival.

Most skinheads wear boots ; in the s army surplus or generic workboots, later Dr. Martens boots and shoes. In s Britain, steel-toe boots worn by skinheads and hooligans were called bovver boots ; whence skinheads have themselves sometimes been called bovver boys.

Skinheads have also been known to wear brogues , loafers or Dr. Martens or similarly styled low shoes.

In recent years, other brands of boots, such as Solovair , Tredair and Grinders, have become popular among skinheads, partly because most Dr.

Martens are no longer made in England. Football -style athletic shoes , by brands such as Adidas or Gola , have become popular with many skinheads.

Female or child skinheads generally wear the same footwear as men, with the addition of monkey boots. The traditional brand for monkey boots was Grafters, but nowadays they are also made by Dr.

Martens and Solovair. In the early days of the skinhead subculture, some skinheads chose boot lace colours based on the football team they supported.

Later, some skinheads particularly highly political ones began to use lace colour to indicate beliefs or affiliations. This practice has become less common, particularly among traditionalist skinheads, who are more likely to choose their colours simply for fashion purposes.

Suedeheads sometimes wore coloured socks. The most popular music style for lates skinheads was 2 Tone , a fusion of ska, rocksteady, reggae, pop and punk rock.

In the late s, after the first wave of punk rock, many skinheads embraced Oi! Notable Oi! American Oi! The Oi!

Many later Oi! Among some skinheads, heavy metal is popular. Bands such as the Canadian act Blasphemy , whose guitarist is black, has been known to popularise and merchandise the phrase "black metal skinheads".

We didn't hang out with white power skinheads, but there were some Oi skinheads who wanted to hang out with us.

There was a record label called "Satanic Skinhead Propaganda" that was known to specialize in neo-Nazi black metal and death metal bands.

Although many white power skinheads listened to Oi! White power music that draws inspiration from hardcore punk is sometimes called hatecore.

The early skinheads were not necessarily part of any political movement, but as the s progressed, the skinheads became more politically active and acts of racially-motivated skinhead violence began to occur in the United Kingdom.

As a result of this change within the skinheads, far right groups such as the National Front and the British Movement saw a rise in the number of white power skinheads among their ranks.

During the late s and early s, however, many skinheads and suedeheads in the United Kingdom rejected both the far left and the far right.

This anti-extremist attitude was musically typified by Oi! Two notable groups of skinheads that spoke out against neo-Nazism and political extremism—and instead spoke out in support of traditional skinhead culture—were the Glasgow Spy Kids in Scotland who coined the phrase Spirit of '69 , and the publishers of the Hard As Nails zine in England.

In the late s, some skinheads in the United Kingdom including black skinheads had engaged in violence against South Asian immigrants an act known as Paki bashing in common slang.

On the far left of the skinhead subculture, redskins and anarchist skinheads take a militant anti-fascist and pro-working class stance.

Internationally, the most notable left-wing skinhead organisation is Skinheads Against Racial Prejudice , which formed in the New York City area in and then spread to other countries.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For the American film, see Skinheads film. Not to be confused with Black Skinhead.

Member of a subculture that originated among working class youths in London. Journal of Social History.

Boy Culture: An Encyclopedia. Rastaman: The Rastafarian Movement in England. Encyclopedia of Contemporary British Culture.

Mod: A Very British Phenomenon. London: Omnibus Press. Archived from the original on 26 November Retrieved 31 August London: Eel Pie Publishing Ltd.

Trojan Mod Reggae Box Set liner notes. London: Trojan Records. Trojan Skinhead Reggae Box Set liner notes. Spirit of '69 - A Skinhead Bible.

Dunoon, Scotland: S. Retrieved 23 May Archived from the original on 19 February Archived from the original on 17 December Archived from the original on 5 April Archived from the original on 5 May Retrieved 11 April Suedehead Reggae Box Set liner notes.

Film Noir Buff. Patterns of Prejudice. New German Critique 64 : 87— Archived from the original on 24 April Retrieved 22 April I n February, I texted my dad to ask if I could interview him about conspiracy theories.

I am ready for it. I meet with him on February 27, , and he is eager to talk. The pickled alien looks over it all. Before he delves into our talk about conspiracy theories, he tells me to look up a song.

The song opens with a guitar strum and a lonely harmonica that pulses with low tones. Keep listening to the lyrics. Now, what happened to Ken Baker?

I hope you can find your way back home. Next stop for Blair Cobbs: world champion boxer. At 33, the elder Cobbs was already a seasoned veteran of the drug trafficking trade.

He was flying solo to his hometown of Philadelphia, having taken off from Compton Airport near Los Angeles. After a quick fuel-up in Missouri, it was somewhere over West Virginia that things began to go bad for the self-taught pilot.

He was flying above a snowy, wooded landscape when mechanical problems compelled him to scramble for the nearest landing strip.

He was forced to attempt an emergency touchdown at the Wheeling Ohio County Airport. It was going to be a tricky landing, as the tower was closed and lighting was limited.

Eugene descended late, missed the runway, and skidded on the ramp, before regaining altitude and hurtling into a ravine in the woods surrounding the airport.

Miraculously, he exited the aircraft basically uninjured, save a minor head wound. But he had little time to linger. When he came to a road near the airport entrance, he flagged down the first driver he saw.

The driver said that Eugene, who asked where exactly he was, had a gash on his head. Airport officials would not discover the wreckage until early the next morning, when a worker on a routine field check noticed that a section of the eight-foot perimeter fence near runway 21 was damaged.

The plane was then spotted, and proper authorities and responders were dispatched. The second thought responders had was that there sure was a hell of a lot of cocaine on board.

He stayed for one night before making his way out of town. Meanwhile, investigators began piecing things together at the crash site.

With no pilot present, they moved on to the plane itself. The invoice was signed without a personal signature, only the name of a company, Pacific Designers Inc.

The Federal Aviation Administration FAA had also been keeping an eye on Eugene, who was described as a notoriously bad pilot known to frequent small, quiet airports where he could fuel up and depart quickly.

According to the Post-Gazette, the FAA had put his plane on a watch list, having cited him on four occasions since , offenses including reckless flying, disregarding air traffic control signals, and lying about his medical status.

The FAA had ordered him to retake his flying exam. He continued to fly, however, using his plane to deliver drugs all over the country.

Prior to the crash, federal agents in Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Phoenix and Chicago had all been looking into his cocaine distribution business.

He had ties to Philadelphia and California, so pretty much the span of the United States. And nobody was able to find him at the time … Mr.

Cobbs was a fugitive from justice. Eugene Cobbs went on the lam. Back in California, his son, Blair, was about to have his world changed forever.

A t the time of the crash, Blair Cobbs was He remembers vividly the day he learned that something was wrong. He had been living easy with his father and stepmother, along with a younger sister, in a grand, white Victorian mansion in the Hollywood Hills.

Blair attended the Beverly Hills school that served as the inspiration for the high school in one of his favorite movies at the time, Clueless.

I have an airplane. We all got a Bentley. His mother died when he was 11, and his grandmother, whom he was close with, died the same year.

He and his stepmother never really bonded. As a young teenager, Cobbs, who is mixed race, was picked on relentlessly.

In middle school, he was perceived as the white kid in a predominately black school, with red hair to boot. But by , after a change of schools, those days were behind him.

Then one day he came home to a DEA raid. His stepmother was crying, and all he knew was that something really bad had happened. Maybe his dad was alive, maybe not.

The strange feeling of being under surveillance actually stirred some hope inside the young teen.

S ix months after the crash, it was summer in Beverly Hills, and his dad was still gone. Then Blair experienced another day in which everything changed.

His stepmother instructed him to pack everything he could fit into one duffel bag. His sister did the same.

His stepmom drove south toward Mexico. When they got to the border, the children were dropped off by their stepmom, given minimal instructions, just a list of checkpoints about where to go — and with that, the kids walked into a foreign country alone.

First a taxi, then a bus, deep into Mexico. Would they live or die? Only the task of taking care of his younger sister drove him.

They could breath easier, but only a little bit. There, using a fake name, Blair enrolled in a high school with an intense Spanish program, to try to get him up to speed on a language he did not speak.

The fact that they were all using aliases triggered a deep sense of loss in Blair, a loss of self.

No identity, no roots. The Americano in Mexico. Sticking out like a sore thumb. Eugene Cobbs had shaken U.

Then he met a friend. On a lonely Mexican basketball court, he ran into year-old Rodney Pinz, who was from the States and spoke English.

I had him meet friends, meet girls, good stuff, teenage stuff. He would come to my house. My family made him food. B lair Cobbs had long revered the sport of boxing.

But while he was eager to learn, he was short on skill. He had no idea how to block or defend.

He took a shitload of punches. I got tired. Black eyes were a constant companion as a result of his new hobby.

It mattered not. One Saturday, after about a week at the gym, Cobbs had an opportunity to box a real bout. An old trainer at the gym started tutoring him, working to bend him into fighting shape.

Cobbs began working out at the gym from sunrise to sundown, sparring and learning combinations. The trainer put him through to round full-body sparring sessions.

Cobbs was still just a kid, but he was already fighting professionals. At nightfall, he would grab an agua fresca or something to eat at a taco stand and then return.

In reality, he simply had nowhere else to go, and nothing else he cared about. Fighters showed up looking to make an impression.

Cobbs was an outsider, and the spectators were usually not on his side. But he learned how to work the crowd.

How to win their favor. Blair kept boxing throughout his teenage years, while the darkness within him grew.

He enjoyed the sport but hated life on the run. Outside of the gym, he struggled. But inside the ring, this mentality made him dangerous. When he was 18, Cobbs had grown to around or pounds.

He was tough to beat at that weight. So for one fight he was matched up against a guy in a heavier class, a Mexican fighter who weighed about pounds.

After winning nearly every recent match, now Blair was about to get his ass kicked, and to make matters worse, his dad was in the crowd to see it, one of the few times he attended.

In the first round, Cobbs got hit hard, the punches too heavy to block. It was a small ring, and there was nowhere to run. He was getting destroyed.

The bell rang for the second round. At the time, Cobbs was watching all of the professional fights he could, and Floyd Mayweather Jr.

During the second round of his big fight, Cobbs recalled how Mayweather liked to use a shoulder roll to pick off shots and then get close, get inside and land short shots.

By midway through the second round, he was doing it himself — shoulder roll, block, defend — and the tide was turning.

I never stopped no matter how bad it got in my life. Indeed, things would get worse for young Blair before they got better.

B lair and his sister returned to the States the same way they entered: on the sly. After spending roughly three years on the run, their father sent them to Edgewater, New Jersey, back to living with their stepmom.

After an arduous bureaucratic process, they also regained their actual identities. The kids got out of Mexico just in time.

Their father was kidnapped for ransom in late When the price was met and Eugene was released by his captors, he was almost immediately arrested.

Blair Cobbs tells the story of his boxing exploits in a fever, but when it comes time to discuss his father, his cadence slows, and the discomfort he feels about those experiences is clear.

After four years on the lam, Eugene was extradited to Houston and then transferred to Wheeling, West Virginia, where he pled guilty and was sentenced to more than 12 years — months — for conspiracy to distribute cocaine and operating as an airman without a license.

After his arrest, he was discovered to have at least five aliases, with matching IDs. Blair tried to push the news from his mind.

He tried to keep boxing. So he returned to the place of his birth, Philadelphia. While his sister stayed behind with their stepmom, Blair moved into the half-abandoned house on a corner lot that his grandmother had once lived in.

Despite his vast life experience, none of what he had learned would help him deal with being alone in Philadelphia. Because at that particular time getting a job was almost a full-time job, you know, going out applying at this place or that, I would be out all day if I needed to, for possibly one opportunity.

Then the electricity was turned off. Followed by the heat and gas. Putting on every piece of clothing he owned just to survive the night.

I was panicking. Because I was really hungry. When I find a little gold ring. It saved my life. He took the little gold ring to a Cash For Gold joint at a nearby shopping center.

And they would be pushing you, making you work hard as fuck. I would get up at like in the morning to try and catch the first bus I could possibly get.

He made it three weeks and one paycheck, and he was out. After that, he finally found the one job that would hold him until he turned pro, at a coffee shop.

There, a bit of stability allowed him to get back to training. On June 28, , at age 24, he made his professional debut, flooring Martique Holland in the first round in Ruffin, North Carolina.

He quickly got off to a record. But then the fights stopped coming. He got a lesson in the politics of boxing. You need support.

A lot of backing. Around the time of his first professional fight, his father was also making a change. On April 10, , Eugene Cobbs decided that prison life no longer suited him.

It was the morning hours, before 10 a. But at 4 p. He was cleaning a parking lot and just walked away. Moore was tasked with tracking him down.

He was 29 years old, and despite a right arm marked in ink, he looked every bit of 16, with short blond hair and a baby face.

He openly shares a penchant for vacations to Disney World. His ambition and enthusiasm for the job are evident, and they extended to the pursuit of Eugene Cobbs.

Nine out of 10 times, the guy would scramble, nervously, maybe call a girlfriend to rendezvous at the nearest hotel, or meet up with his drug dealer.

But when Moore answered the phone this time and heard the name Eugene Cobbs, he stood on alert. He remembered the first chase.

The driver took him to a Kroger grocery store in nearby Sabraton, West Virginia, where he waited while the escapee went inside and received a Western Union money order.

The cabbie then drove Eugene an hour and a half to Pittsburgh and dropped him at a Greyhound station. And I got a call from a local cab company who advised that they had picked up Mr.

Moore started interviewing family members and acquaintances, and nobody knew a thing. She was eventually arrested for assisting in the escape.

But the account of how Moore eventually got his man is much less cinematic. The marshal was seated at his desk, the phone rang, and he was given an anonymous tip.

Simple as that. He did not put up a fight, although he did present false identification documents.

Eugene was extradited from Mexico that very day and escorted to Los Angeles, where he was taken into custody by deputy marshals, then transported, once more, to West Virginia.

Back in Philadelphia, by the time Blair found out his dad had escaped, Eugene was soon back in custody.

On August 11, , Eugene Cobbs pled guilty to the escape and was sentenced to 14 months, to be served consecutive to his prior sentence.

It was at that point that he decided to take a gamble on a flight to Las Vegas to try to get noticed, to try to get backing.

It was a risky proposition. He had a steady job and a girlfriend, Melissa. And to top it off, he and Melissa had recently welcomed a son of their own into the world.

He made the trip anyway. Once in Vegas he was able to get a few sparring sessions in front of some prominent eyes.

But in the end, his manager at the time made a mess of things, Cobbs says. He soon lost his apartment. His girlfriend and son stayed with one of her acquaintances, but Blair, unable to support himself, let alone a family, bounced around.

T hings in Philly remained bleak. It took him nearly a year to get back on his feet, both mentally and spiritually. To get up and take another shot.

Constantly moving from one place to the next. But dying too. Going through the worst experience I could possibly go through and surviving that to move on, to another level.

But did I really survive or did a piece of me just die in order to live on? There was a lot going on from a mental perspective.

Finally, Cobbs caught a break. He hooked up with Kenny Mason, a trainer who had worked with recent middleweight world champion Julian Williams.

Cobbs began to find a rhythm with Mason. Mason also gave him a place to crash. Sort of. It was literally a walk-in closet.

But it was in that closet that Cobbs found God. He put up a vision board. He found a church, Casa de Gloria. And he got back to the gym.

Hopkins offered him some desperately needed encouragement, and Cobbs picked up his training even more. He started training other boxers as well, to earn some dough.

He decided to give Vegas another shot. Through it all, he says Melissa stuck with him. There was no alternative. Cobbs saw only two options if he remained in the city: Death or jail.

As the miles started passing, the freer we started to feel. We were as happy as hell. It was better than being there. The car was packed: father, mother, son.

Everything they had. Once in Vegas, Cobbs and his family were still homeless. They lived out of their car north of Vegas at a pit stop frequented by truckers.

Sometimes they pitched a pop-up tent. He calls it one of the most peaceful times of his life. It was just us living, day to day.

And being appreciative of each moment that passed. Because each moment was a better moment. In Mexico he had felt low and therefore he was low.

Now his new attitude led him out of the hole. He could feel the universe conspiring for his success.

He hooked up with a distant relative who put him and his family up for a few weeks. He and Melissa got jobs, his at the Cromwell Hotel.

Soon enough, they had a place of their own. And after his cousin put in a word with an ex-boxer, the former super-bantamweight titlist Bones Adams, Cobbs had himself a trainer.

Just like the rhythm in the ring — pop, pop, pop — all of the things he needed in his life started to click into place.

Next, he hooked up with a manager, Greg Hannley. Hannley staked him, with around two grand a month, so that Cobbs could train full time.

Adams says that right from the start he saw the potential. His first fight in three years was on May 18, , in Tijuana, where he scored a second-round technical knockout.

He was finally Pop, pop, pop. In he was named the Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame prospect of the year.

Eugene is now living with Blair and his family in Vegas, and just like his son, the father is looking for a fresh start. But he has evolved.

But Blair has taken the handle and run with it. People want to have charisma. They want to be great, greater than they are. They want to believe, to have the passion and drive that they can do anything.

Fight insiders still describe Blair Cobbs, a southpaw, as a wild man in the ring, and spectators love the passion he brings. I kind of just developed these multiple character personalities and [The Flair] just comes out whenever the cameras are on me.

Blair Cobbs remains undefeated. And he believes that his best chapter is yet to be written. He has over on display in one small room, affixed by magnets to sheet metal on the wall.

Many are named for hit TV shows, music or films of the day. Fonseca began collecting cereal boxes about 10 years ago, amassing hundreds of them, which were soon piling up inside his home.

She also suggested that he start a YouTube channel, as a way to preserve and document boxes for posterity before throwing them out.

In videos posted every Saturday morning a nod to the iconic TV time slot when kids watched cartoons while eating sugary cereals , Fonseca talks and reviews cereal.

An episode about Hostess Donettes cereal, for example, covered donut-shaped cereals of the past Fonseca prefers powdered Donutz cereal from the late s.

With plus episodes, Cereal Time TV has amassed more than 8 million views. Fonseca is a part of a mostly male online community that obsesses over cereal.

Dan Goubert, 23, another cereal enthusiast, says his fixation began when he was young, but it has always been about more than just the cereal.

His arms and legs poked out of the rice squares, and he defeated his enemies by teleporting them back to their home planets instead of killing them.

The Empty Bowl has a devoted following, including Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda, who praised the podcast on Twitter , while the Cerealously blog has garnered mentions in Forbes and amassed more than 17, followers on Instagram.

Like Goubert, Thomas Hicks, a year-old actor and model, says he embraced a love of cereal at a young age and has been obsessed with it his whole life.

He recalls waking up in the middle of the night, too excited about his morning bowl of cereal to sleep.

And while Fonseca basically likes every cereal he reviews, Hicks is more critical. He believes that the perfect cereal has yet to be created.

While his reviews can be harsh, Hicks claims they come from a place of love. Despite their different approaches, all three men exude an infectious joy for their favorite breakfast food — and they have formed connections over this shared bond.

Invented in by James Caleb Jackson, an enterprising doctor, cereal was originally a health food. It was bland, boring and so difficult to chew that you had to soak it in milk overnight to make it edible.

It took another doctor to turn cereal into an iconic mass-produced food: John Harvey Kellogg. Kellogg championed bland foods, at least in part because he thought a simple diet could help prevent masturbation.

So when Will added sugar to Corn Flakes and began selling his sweeter version to the public in , it kicked off a decades-long feud filled with lawsuits, accusations of stolen recipes, and public acrimony that divided the Kellogg family.

The introduction of television into the American home brought commercials with animated cereal mascots.

Crunch, and Lucky Charms with the ginger-haired Lucky the Leprechaun. Toys and prizes inside cereal boxes, such as baking soda—powered atomic submarines and Star Trek badges, also became more prevalent around this time although Will Kellogg is credited with inventing the concept back in Goodsell says his own cereal lust began young.

Instead, he was on the hunt for the absurdly hard to find. The biweekly magazine was one of the few ways to get information on the pricing and availability of everything from Barbies to Hot Wheels, and it also ran sales listings and wanted ads.

There were ads for subscription newsletters and zines too — the analog version of eBay crossed with a blog. Aside from Goodsell, there are two other big names from that first generation of serious cereal collectors: Duane Dimock and Scott Bruce.

And there was no love lost between Dimock and Bruce. Dimock, now 62, claims that he was the first person to collect cereal boxes as a category.

He started collecting in , going to swap meets in the L. Bruce who declined to comment for this article , meanwhile, had been a driving force behind the lunch box collectors market.

Cereal Box. Dimock was incensed. He says Bruce had called him a few months earlier, asking about the state of the cereal box market and discussing their shared interest in collecting.

Instead, he started plotting. Kogut followed up with a letter threatening litigation and warning Dimock not to bring any of his parody zines to an upcoming collectibles show in Dallas.

Bruce, his wife, or his lunch box and cereal box businesses. In July of , Dimock went to the collectibles show in Dallas. As he handed out his flyers, Dimock wondered how Bruce would react.

Would he yell at him? Hit him? He soon found out. As Dimock walked back to his table, he saw Bruce there examining his stuff. Both he and Dimock continued to collect cereal boxes.

Nostalgic obsession can take on many forms. Initially released by General Mills in U. Spanish-language markets, it was a honey and cinnamon flavored corn puff cereal.

Then, a few years ago, he was visiting a friend in Minnesota. Fonseca was like a kid in a candy store. There were dozens of old boxes, classic cereal prizes, and even original animation cells from a few commercials.

That pull of the past can also create problems, especially when it bumps up against the push toward the future. Cereal is always changing, like when General Mills removed the high-fructose corn syrup and artificial colors from Trix in Red 40, Blue 1 and Yellow 6 were replaced by colors derived from purple carrots, radishes and turmeric.

Fonseca thought it was a bad move. Goubert agreed. What drew most enthusiasts to cereal in the first place was the novelty: the many variations of Cheerios, from Honey Nut to Apple Cinnamon; the inventive cereal shapes, from waffles to four-leaf clovers, cinnamon buns to SpongeBob.

The surprise within the box: Which Jungle Book figurine or baking soda—powered submarine would they find?

Goubert wants them to explore more nuances within the taste palate. There are no heated disagreements or feuds. And their hobby has even gone academic.

Dimock now gives lectures on the history of cereal. One product he talks about is Korn-Kinks, from It was one of the first cereals with a mascot: Kornelia Kinks, a racist caricature of an African-American girl.

He cites it as evidence of the way cereal from each era is reflective of the larger American culture at that time, for better or often for worse.

A few decades after Korn-Kinks, in , a sprinting Jesse Owens became the first black athlete to have his image emblazoned across the Wheaties box, and today the beaming face of tennis superstar Serena Williams adorns the iconic orange box.

But despite this focus on serious historical issues, even Dimock seems to have mellowed a bit. A few weeks after being interviewed for this story, he sent the writer an email.

Good or bad. How an audacious con man with fake ties to the pinnacles of the church ran an epic scheme and swindled those who trusted him most.

He would then guide the pellets around, pretending that each one was a sheep he had to tend to. Olsen, now 62, has a salt-and-pepper mustache that accents his serious demeanor, and his boots display telltale signs of a lifetime of hard, hands-on work.

After graduating high school and taking a string of construction jobs, Olsen jumped at the opportunity to launch his own business. Olsen eventually expanded his customer base to include hundreds of farmers and cattle ranchers across Utah County, which allowed him to fulfill his childhood dream of purchasing a herd of sheep.

People tend to know their neighbors in the part of Utah County where Olsen lives, a region south of the cities of Orem and Provo, where clusters of modest homes are grouped together between acres of open farmland.

So Olsen frequently saw Al McKee, an unassuming-looking middle-aged entrepreneur who had moved, with his family, to Utah County in the late s from a town outside of Salt Lake City.

McKee wore his gray facial hair in a goatee and would often boast, in passing, about his business connections.

He owned and operated a company, the Ophir Minerals and Aggregate Group, that mined industrial materials like silica and calcium carbonate.

Their families were in the same ward — a term used to represent a local church congregation of Mormons, which is presided over by a bishop.

In , McKee heard that Olsen was beginning to raise a herd of sheep, and he made him a proposition. He brought Olsen to a seven-mile stretch of land on the edges of the county.

Dotted with cedar trees, the area, known as the Tintic Mining District, had bustled with industry in its 19th-century heyday.

McKee told Olsen that he had bought the land and envisioned multiple mines yielding tremendous profits, like it had when settlers first staked claims in the area.

The work McKee planned to do would primarily be underground, leaving an opportunity for Olsen to use the land above for his herd.

After a contract was written and signed, Olsen began clearing some of the cedar trees to make the area easier to navigate.

He rebuilt fences and reseeded grass so that the sheep would have plenty to eat come spring. A deeper friendship between Olsen and McKee began to blossom as a result of the deal.

Meanwhile, their wives bonded through their participation in a Mormon mentorship program that offered guidance to young women.

Louis for a Paul McCartney concert. Almost 15 years later, McKee offered to sell Olsen some farming equipment at a substantial discount — a lucrative opportunity, given that Olsen could use the equipment for both his fertilizer company and his sheep-herding business.

Olsen never received any of the equipment McKee had promised him. Instead, McKee kept the money for himself.

As Olsen and his wife would later learn, the bogus equipment sale was one of many fraudulent deals McKee had been pitching to investors all over Utah County.

Before the schemes were finally exposed, his plot had ensnared a national corporation and a prominent Utah County politician.

Sadly, the story of Al McKee and his schemes is not an anomaly in Utah. According to the FBI, the state is a hotbed for white-collar crime, with billions of dollars lost annually by individuals who fall victim to con men.

That deep trust is then used to persuade victims to invest money into legitimate-sounding business ventures.

Although LDS Church officials declined interview requests on the topic for this article, prominent members have been privately warning fellow Mormons of the practice for decades.

Prosecutors throughout Utah have made combating affinity fraud a priority as well. But even when perpetrators are successfully convicted of their crimes, victims rarely receive even a fraction of their investments back.

He and his family are struggling to make ends meet. Anderson, now 72, took his mission trip to Germany after high school, where the friends he met and served with were all planning to attend Brigham Young University in Provo.

They encouraged Anderson to do the same, and after writing to the famous Mormon university, he was granted admission and a scholarship.

He met his future wife, Molly, while attending the school. He eventually transitioned to defense work, solidifying a long-held belief that working as a trial lawyer was a good way to make a living while also helping a lot of people.

In his mids, Anderson served as a Utah County commissioner; then he went back to practicing law, until people in the community encouraged him to run for public office again nearly two decades later.

He won the election and retook office as a Utah County commissioner in The nonprofit organization serves as a bridge between the public and private sectors to promote economic growth.

Every mineral known to man has been found in abundance in Utah, McKee told the group. All of these minerals, he added, would make Utah County in particular attractive to Fortune companies like 3M and Ford.

Despite this initial impression, Anderson would soon end up working closely with McKee. Utah County had embarked on a project to resurface and rehabilitate Interstate 15, a freeway that runs through the entirety of the county.

When McKee ran into some logistical issues, Anderson, in his role as county commissioner, was called upon to help sort things out.

The eventual success of the interstate project gave Anderson a newfound sense of respect for McKee, and his initial skepticism about the man soon faded entirely.

McKee introduced him to people who said that they worked with 3M and mentioned that McKee had saved the company billions.

McKee frequently lectured at local universities on the promising future of the mineral industry in Utah County. In many of these presentations, McKee would note that his knowledge of the minerals in the region came from studying at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT.

On multiple occasions, McKee worked closely with the county government on economic development, and the commission even named Ophir as the Utah County Business of the Year in When Anderson was up for reelection in , he won handily with 81 percent of the vote.

In what Anderson estimates was , McKee informed him that he had cancer of the esophagus and was dying. Anderson heard secondhand stories about McKee traveling internationally to receive cancer treatments that were not yet approved by the U.

Food and Drug Administration. Mutual acquaintances told him that McKee was preparing to hand over control of the Ophir Minerals and Aggregate Group to his son.

J ust east of the Tintic Mining District, at the junction of two state highways, is Elberta, Utah, population It was once the sight of a major railroad, but for years only tumbleweed has run across the overgrown tracks.

Plans to renovate the area had developed and stalled multiple times. But, in , while Anderson thought McKee was focused solely on his cancer treatment, the entrepreneur reached out to Ames Construction, the company he had worked with on the Interstate 15 project, with a promising offer in hand.

He said he was working alongside leaders of the LDS Church, who wanted to construct a six-building industrial park to serve as the focal point of a newly refurbished railroad, both of which would attract new businesses to the area.

If Ames Construction agreed to work with McKee on the development project, the company stood to make millions. He also provided Ames with letters purportedly written and signed by Bishop Gary Stevenson, at the time the Presiding Bishop responsible for overseeing all of the worldly business conducted by the LDS Church.

Leadership at Ames agreed to work with McKee on the industrial park, and the company began spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to prepare for construction.

In addition to allocating funds for equipment and engineering work, Ames Construction also paid McKee for expenses that the entrepreneur was supposedly incurring while preparing the site.

Then, in April of , McKee called, out of the blue. According to Anderson, McKee told him about contracts he had with 3M for calcium carbonate and for the work he was doing to revitalize the Tintic Mining District.

McKee needed assistance with getting his business in order, and he offered Anderson a six-figure salary if he would help.

Anderson agreed to look at how Ophir was doing before committing.

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